numb toe

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numb toe

Postby Nancy » Sun Sep 27, 2009 9:01 pm

I have been suffering from plantar fasciitis for about four months. I think it was caused by a combination of things. I have four kids and never sit down, I try to exercise daily (walking, running, aerobics, biking...), I started wearing sandals once summer hit, and I began wearing inserts in my shoes to help with arthritis of the knees. I have been doing stretches and have eased up on the exercise, but with no relief. Two days ago, the inside of my big toe became numb in an area about the size of a dime and is still numb. I mostly notice it when I am not wearing shoes. Hopefully this is a common occurrence related to plantar fasciitis, and not something worse. Any ideas? Should I just begin with your method of treating my problems and see if it goes away along with the heel pain?
Nancy
 

Re: numb toe

Postby Allison » Mon Sep 28, 2009 10:09 am

Hello Nancy,

It sounds as though you’ve had a busy and active summer – especially with the exercise and chasing after 4 kids :) I know you have added 3 different posts to the forum, so I will try to answer all of your questions in this one reply – to make both of our lives a bit easier. Please bear with me, as this is a very LONG post…

I have been suffering from plantar fasciitis for about four months. I think it was caused by a combination of things. I have four kids and never sit down, I try to exercise daily (walking, running, aerobics, biking...), I started wearing sandals once summer hit, and I began wearing inserts in my shoes to help with arthritis of the knees. I have been doing stretches and have eased up on the exercise, but with no relief. Two days ago, the inside of my big toe became numb in an area about the size of a dime and is still numb. I mostly notice it when I am not wearing shoes. Hopefully this is a common occurrence related to plantar fasciitis, and not something worse. Any ideas? Should I just begin with your method of treating my problems and see if it goes away along with the heel pain?

I have to tell you, I am quite concerned to hear that you are experiencing some numbness in and around your big toe. Any numbing sensation is not a regular symptom of plantar fasciitis. Numbness usually indicates that you have nerve damage in your foot of some kind. This is a serious issue, and something that you should discuss with your physician immediately. Your plantar fasciitis or perhaps a bone spur growth are pressing on the nerves in your foot causing this numbness. Your physician needs to examine your injury in order to remedy any nerve damage that has happened and prevent further harm to the nerves in your foot.

I’m glad that you have eased up with the stretching, with plantar fasciitis it is especially important to properly warm up your muscles and pay careful attention to your posture and stance to make sure you aren’t aggravating your injury any further. Using inserts with your sandals and shoes is a good start, but you should take it easy on the exercising for a while and start treating your plantar fasciitis more aggressively in order to get some pain relief results immediately. If left untreated plantar fasciitis can alter the way that you walk or perform certain activities, which may eventually cause additional knee, hip or lower back injuries. You have already experienced arthritis in your knees, and your plantar fasciitis will most likely add undue stress to this injury.

I will describe some treatment options at more length below, under your final question…

I am sure that I have plantar fasciitis, but not sure if I have heel spurs. Can I use the US treatment anyway, or do I have to have the bone spurs removed surgically (if I have them)?

Heel spurs are bony outgrowths composed of calcium deposits that typically develop around the bottom or back of the heel. It’s basically your body’s way of healing itself and protecting your plantar fasciitis injury by adding extra support. Heel spurs always vary in shape and size but they are usually shelf-like or hook-shaped. Even if you do not have a heel spur at this time, I believe you are leaving yourself susceptible to a heel spur if you do not consult your physician and initiate treatment for your plantar fasciitis right away. Please keep in mind (if you do develop a heel spur) that although surgery is always an option, many individuals are able to heal a bone spur in natural, non-invasive ways – however it does take a lot of time, patience and diligence with a proper treatment plan.

Ultrasound treatments can be used on the heel even if you do have heel spurs. This can actually help to relieve pain from the bone spur and decrease any scar tissue that is present in and around your injury. I will describe the ultrasound treatments a bit more below, under your final question…

Since you are experiencing some numbness in your big toe I am a bit worried that you may have some small heel spur growth which is adding pressure to the nerves in your foot. This is merely my thought on the matter, but again please see your physician immediately to determine whether you have bone spur growth of any kind in your foot.

I’ll describe in a bit of detail the advantages to each of the treatments- so you may get a better idea of how they can treat your plantar fasciitis and what alternative methods you can use to apply the same treatment. I’ll end with my recommendations of what would work best for your injury.

Ankle/Achilles Freezie Wrap – This particular product provides Cold Compression Therapy through use of the R.I.C.E. method, and helps to decrease pain and swelling in your injury. Although the Freezie Wrap can ensure application of several of the R.I.C.E. steps simultaneously, you can adapt this therapy for yourself at home. Start by following the R.I.C.E. formula – rest your injury as much as you possibly can and decrease your overall activity level. Ice the swollen or inflamed area between 2 to 4 times a day for 15 to 20 minutes. Do not place the ice directly onto your injury as this may cause cryoburn (freezer burn to the skin). Compress your injury by adding slight pressure to decrease swelling. You can accomplish compression through use of a compression wrap of any kind OR wrap a towel or scarf around the ice pack and your injury as tight as is comfortable for you. Finally, elevate your foot injury by propping your foot on a few pillows so it is resting above hip-level. This will allow any fluid in your foot to drain.

Ankle/Achilles Inferno Wrap – You can promote Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy to your injured plantar and effectively reduce pain and inflammation in your foot by applying the Inferno Wrap. Remember that blood is like the transport mechanism for everything that’s good and healthy in your body – by increasing blood flow in your injury you can increase the amount of oxygen, nutrient, and antibody rich blood that reaches your plantar fasciitis injury. This method of treatment can be applied at home through the use of a warm washcloth or towel applied directly onto your injury. Although this alternative method won’t have the same effects as the use of an Inferno Wrap, it should soothe the pain from your injury a bit. Alternate warm treatments with R.I.C.E. treatments approximately 2 to 4 times a day for 15 to 20 minutes.

Therapeutic Ultrasound – Ultrasound treatment stimulates the tissue beneath your skin’s surface by using sound waves. It is essentially like a high frequency massage that penetrates approximately 4 inches below the surface of your skin. The heating and massaging effects of the ultrasound will speed the healing process, reduce swelling and heal damaged tissue (while softening scar tissue). This will also increase the nutrient absorption rate and blood flow within your plantar injury. This treatment is administered by many physical therapists and physicians. Remember that when applied directly to the skin, an ultrasound head cannot effectively transfer the sound waves into your injury without a conductive medium of some sort – ultrasound gel.

Night Splint/Dorsal Splint – A splint will generally provide you added support for your injury. It should ideally cushion your plantar and provide comfortable support for the arch of your foot. This will also help to restrict movement of your foot during times of rest. You may notice that your foot feels tight overnight and your first few steps in the morning cause you unbearable pain – if this is the case then a night splint will reduce the tightness and pain in your plantar fascia throughout the night.

Although I strongly feel that all of these treatments will help to treat your plantar fasciitis injury, I think you may get the most benefit initially from the Inferno Wrap Plantar and Night Splint. These items will give you a nice start on your road to recovery, and you can always keep the other products in mind for a later time. If you are experiencing specific periods of substantial pain, it is probable that the plantar fasciitis has temporarily flared up. Pain from these flareups can be quickly reduced by the use of the Mendmeshop Freezie Wrap Plantar products. The compression combined with the cold gel pack gets rid of inflammation fast and keep the plantar pain minimized.

Again I cannot stress the importance of consulting your physician regarding the numbness you are experiencing, your concerns about any bone spur growth, and to develop a treatment plan that will work for you. You should also speak with your physician before applying any at-home treatments.

I hope I have adequately addressed all of your questions and concerns, please feel free to contact one of our knowledgeable customer service representatives if you need any additional guidance. You may phone us: North America – 1-866-237-9608 or International – 1-705-445-3505

Good luck Nancy, and please keep us updated as to the progress with your injury!

Allison

http://www.aidmyplantar.com
Please keep your doctor and/or therapist informed of all treatments you plan to utilize. This information should not be used in place of a visit, call, or consultation with or the advice of your physician or other qualified medical professional.
Allison
 
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